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Functional Nutrition Blog

Supplement of the Week: Designs for Health XanthOmega Krill Oil

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Apr 22, 2015 12:00:00 PM

Quick Overview

XanthOmega™ Krill Oil provides a generous 12 mg per serving of the powerful antioxidant astaxanthin to help achieve optimum benefits from this potent carotenoid. It would take eight conventional krill softgels to equal the astaxanthin levels in just one XanthOmega™ softgel!

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Topics: cardiovascular health, skin health, smart supplementation, eye health

Health Benefits of DHEA

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Apr 13, 2015 8:00:00 AM

DHEA

By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS – Dean of Academics, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Over 2500 medical articles have reported the benefits of dehydroepiandrosterone, or DHEA, a hormone secreted from the adrenal glands. As a dietary supplement, DHEA has many applications to human health. Following is a discussion of some of these applications.

How DHEA works

Aging is a gradual deterioration of our various organs and systems. It is not just "getting older." People don't simply die because they are older. Death results from failure of an organ or system.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, anti-aging, immune health, degenerative disease, endocrine health, smart supplementation, lifestyle

Health Benefits of Bathing

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Apr 9, 2015 8:00:00 AM

The Science of Bathing

Water is commonly employed to affect the human body using hot baths to relax muscles or ice packs to reduce swelling. In holistic medicine, water is also used as a healing modality to restore proper blood flow and ultimately restore the health of the blood and the whole person. Water is a miraculous substance because it can carry great amounts of energy and heat. It conducts heat to and from a living system and can conform itself to any shape. The use of water to restore health is commonly referred to as hydrotherapy.

Hydrotherapy can be performed in many ways, but essentially it causes tissues to relax (heat) and then contract (cold), thereby moving stagnated blood and immune components, releasing toxins, easing stress, and flooding tissues with nutrients. There are many other types of hydrotherapy, such as alternating heat and cold packs, alternating hot and cold soaks on specific parts of the body, poultices, compresses, and constitutional hydrotherapy (typically done by doctor or trained staff). One powerful form of hydrotherapy you can do at home is bathing.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, musculoskeletal health, lifestyle

The Health Benefits of Colostrum

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Mar 9, 2015 8:00:00 AM

Colostrum 

By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS – Dean of Academics, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Colostrum is the first milk that a mammal produces after pregnancy. This secretion of colostrum does not last for long; rather, it is created for the newborn to give it vital nutrients, antibodies, and other factors it needs right after birth. Therefore, after a few short days, the production of colostrum all but stops.1

So what makes colostrum special for adult individuals? In fact, through hundreds of years of use and over 1,000 clinical studies, colostrum has been demonstrated to be safe and effective for a variety of clinical conditions. These include viral illnesses, allergies and autoimmune diseases, heart disease, cancer, weight-loss programs, athletic stress, leaky gut syndrome, wound healing, and muscle repair and growth.2 In short, the most important components of colostrum can basically be broken down into two major categories: immunity modulator and growth factors.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, immune health, degenerative disease, smart supplementation

Health Benefits of CoQ10

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Mar 2, 2015 8:00:00 AM

Coenzyme Q10

By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS – Dean of Academics, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Although structurally related to vitamin K, coenzyme Q 10 (CoQ10) is not a vitamin, but rather coenzyme that helps to utilize oxygen as part of its important role in cellular energy metabolism. Research has also shown that CoQ10 functions in a number of other beneficial ways including free radical scavenging.1 Following is a brief review of that research.

Free radicals

Chemically, free radicals can be defined as a molecule with an unpaired electron. In the process of trying to balance itself by gaining or losing an electron, the free radical causes oxidative damage on a cellular level. CoQ10 has the unique property of being able to accept or donate an electron without itself becoming a free radical. By doing this CoQ10 can help neutralize free radicals and the oxidative damage they cause. This is significant since numerous disease states are thought to be due to excessive oxidative stress of free radicals, including hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite, superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. In addition, CoQ10 may inhibit certain enzymes involved in the formation of these free radicals.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, anti-aging, degenerative disease, smart supplementation

Health Benefits of Cinnamon

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Feb 23, 2015 8:00:00 AM

Cinnamon:
A Supplement for Diabetes, Body Composition, Cardiovascular Health & Antioxidant Protection
By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS

Don’t you just love the smell and taste of cinnamon in a warm, gooey cinnamon bun? As it turns out, the cinnamon may actually provide you with some significant health benefits (although the same can’t be said of the gooey bun; sorry). So let’s take a closer look at cinnamon.

Background

The use of cinnamon for health is not new. In fact, cinnamon bark has been used for several thousand years in traditional Eastern and Western systems of medicine, for such purposes as anorexia, bloating, dyspepsia with nausea, flatulent colic, and spastic conditions of the GI tract.1 Cinnamon also has a history of traditional use in Korea, China and Russia for treating people with diabetes.2

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Topics: cardiovascular health, anti-aging, weight management, herbs & botanicals, degenerative disease, smart supplementation

Health Benefits of Cayenne Pepper

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Feb 20, 2015 8:00:00 AM

Cayenne
(Capsicum annuum; C. frutescens)

By Art Presser, PharmD - President, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Background:

Cayenne or Capsicum consists of the dried fruit of Capsicum frutescens, Capsicum annum, or a large number of hybrids of these species and varieties within the Solanaceae (Nightshade) family that are capsaicin rich. Because these plants have been cultivated for such a long time, peppers from them differ widely from one another in size, shape, and potency. They are not true peppers but were misnamed by the early Spanish explorers who confused their pungency with the pepper they were used to, namely black pepper (Piper nigrum) in the Piperaceae family.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, whole foods, weight management, herbs & botanicals, smart supplementation

Does Mercury Toxicity Cause Hypertension

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Dec 12, 2014 8:00:00 AM

Hypertension and Mercury Toxicity
Ronald Grisanti D.C., D.A.B.C.O., D.A.C.B.N., M.S.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, detoxification

Health Benefits of Cat's Claw Plant

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Nov 24, 2014 11:56:00 AM

Cat’s Claw (Uncaria tomentosa)  

By Art Presser, PharmD - President, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Background:

Cat’s Claw is a woody vine that winds itself around trees, upwards of 100 feet, in the Peruvian rainforests. Hook-like thorns adorn the leaves, resembling the claws of cats, hence the name. For hundreds of years, local Indians, medicine people, and shamans have stewed the inner bark and roots of Cat’s Claw to prepare medicines to treat a variety of illnesses.

There are actually over 30 species of Uncaria, however the two species of medicinal interest are U. guianensis and U. tomentosa. Although both species produce similar benefits, U. tomentosa has been more thoroughly researched, has a greater range of uses, and is hence preferred in the American market.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, degenerative disease, emotional health, smart supplementation

Health Benefits of Bromelain

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Nov 10, 2014 9:00:00 AM

Bromelain

By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS – Dean of Academics, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Bromelain is a proteolytic (i.e., proteindigesting) enzyme found in pineapples. Bromelain has proteolytic action on a variety of proteins, breaking them down into smaller peptides and amino acids1. Beyond its protein digesting capacity, research has shown that bromelain has anti-inflammatory activity. This is not surprising since different proteolytic enzymes, including bromelain, have been used to treat a variety of inflammatory conditions including sports injury and other acute trauma. Positive results have been observed over a thirty year period in both animal models and human trials.

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Topics: cardiovascular health, herbs & botanicals, smart supplementation