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Health Topics Hub

The Health Benefits of Bee Pollen, Propolis & Royal Jelly

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Oct 28, 2014 4:00:00 PM

Bee Pollen, Propolis & Royal Jelly

By Gene Bruno, MS, MHS – Dean of Academics, Huntington College of Health Sciences

The common honey bee is a fascinating little insect that offers us humans some valuable natural foods with health-promoting benefits. These “super foods” include bee pollen, royal jelly and propolis.

Bee Pollen

Bee pollen is the pollen gathered from plants by honey bees, and brought back to their hive. Bee pollen contains all of the eight essential amino acids in amounts that vary between five to seven times the level found in equal weights of traditional high protein foods. It also contains vitamins A, D, E, K, C and bioflavonoids, as well as the complete B- complex; especially pantothenic acid (B5) and niacin. The high levels of vitamin B5 are particularly beneficial for the adrenal glands which are adversely affected during stress. Bee pollen has been used traditionally as an anti-aging food, and an energy food. As a matter of fact, it has been used by a number of Olympic athletes to improve their performance.

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Topics: anti-aging, smart supplementation, cardiovascular health

Aspirin Alternatives: Salicin Containing Herbs

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Oct 8, 2014 4:55:00 PM

By Art Presser, PharmD - President, Huntington College of Health Sciences 

Smart SupplementationTM is a free series of educational literature created by Huntington College of Health Sciences (HCHS) as a public service. Although copyrighted, it may be freely photocopied and distributed, but may not be altered in any way. Smart SupplementationTM is not intended as medical advice. For diagnosis and treatment of any medical condition, consult your physician.

The Willow is a shrub or tree depending on its size (some can grow to 50 feet), native to England, Europe, Asia, and North America. There are 300 species of Willow, White Willow the most famous of them. Native Americans relied on Willow for its analgesic properties.

In 1829, another bright pharmacist, this time a Frenchman named H. Leroux, discovered Willow’s active chemical, salicin. In 1838, pure salicylic acid was synthesized by an Italian chemist, not from Willow but Wintergreen and other plants. Salicin and salicylic acid were widely used through the 19th century for fever, gout, pain, and inflammation. However, as usual, when you isolate chemicals from plants or synthesize them, you almost always increase their toxicity. The farther away you stray from Nature, the more likely you are to do harm. And such was the case. The high doses used routinely led to gastric irritation and vomiting.

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Topics: herbs & botanicals, cardiovascular health, musculoskeletal health

Antioxidants: Our Defense Against Free Radicals

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Sep 22, 2014 8:00:00 AM

By Art Presser, PharmD - President, Huntington College of Health Sciences

Smart SupplementationTM is a free series of educational literature created by Huntington College of Health Sciences (HCHS) as a public service. Although copyrighted, it may be freely photocopied and distributed, but may not be altered in any way. Smart SupplementationTM is not intended as medical advice. For diagnosis and treatment of any medical condition, consult your physician.

The terms “antioxidant” and “free radicals” are two of the most tossed around “buzz” words used in the health field today. What are they, and how do they effect our lives?

As researchers began to become interested in degenerative disease, aging, their causes, and how they can be prevented, they were lead to an interesting discovery. Our body and foods were already on the case. In fact, Hippocrates, who lived in around 400 BC, may have had the first insight. He said that in foods there are tiny substances that act on the body, and in some way change life. He went on to state that our lives depended on these changes. It amazes me, in 1996, just how “right on” Hippocrates was.

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Topics: anti-aging, cardiovascular health, degenerative disease

Supplement of the Week: Designs for Health Vitamin D Supreme

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Aug 28, 2014 6:00:00 AM

Quick Overview

Vitamin D Supreme provides a clinically useful dose of vitamin D3 and vitamin K in both the K1 and MK-7 form of K2. This formula contains higher therapeutic doses than Vitamin D Synergy for situations where more aggressive repletion is required. Vitamins D and K are essential for optimal bone and arterial health and for maintaining the immune system in proper balance. The amount of vitamin D and K in this formula may be beneficial for those who do not get adequate sun exposure and/or dietary sources of these vitamins. Vitamins D & K work as a team. Thus, increasing doses of vitamin D will increase the need for vitamin K.

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Topics: immune health, cardiovascular health, smart supplementation, musculoskeletal health

Krill Oil versus Fish Oil Infographic

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Aug 18, 2014 6:00:00 AM

Supplement of the week: Designs for Health XanthOmega Krill Oil

Quick Overview

XanthOmega™ Krill Oil provides a generous 12 mg per serving of the powerful antioxidant astaxanthin to help achieve optimum benefits from this potent carotenoid. It would take eight conventional krill softgels to equal the astaxanthin levels in just one XanthOmega™ softgel! 

XanthOmega™ Krill Oil has a high phospholipid content, standardized to a minimum of 40% phospholipids, mostly as phosphatidylcholine. This updated version is considered to be a virgin krill oil -the purest form available. It contains higher phospholipid bioavailability, which enhances the absorption of the powerful antioxidant astaxanthin. Many studies suggest that this exceptionally high level of astaxanthin offers an array of benefits, which may include powerful antioxidant properties, cardiovascular health, sports performance, eye support, skin health, anti-inflammatory and gastric health support.
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Topics: brain health, cardiovascular health, smart supplementation, macronutrients

Supplement of the Week: Designs for Health OmegAvail Synergy

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Jul 16, 2014 3:00:00 PM

Quick Overview

This unique omega 3-6-7-9 formula contains a blend of wild deep-sea sourced fish oils containing the omega-3 fats (EPA/DHA) in the TruTG™ form, the most important omega-6 fat (GLA from borage oil), the omega-7 fat palmitoleic acid and omega-9 fat oleic acid from certified virgin organic macadamia nut oil. EPA helps keep GLA metabolism in an anti-inflammatory mode. In addition, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) plays as many important roles in human health as EPA, along with promoting brain wellness.
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Topics: cardiovascular health, smart supplementation, macronutrients

The Health Benefits Of Pastured Eggs

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Aug 31, 2011 6:17:00 AM

No nutrient rich food I can think of has been given a worse reputation than chicken eggs. Well, maybe raw milk is getting the boot now, but eggs are right there with them. The poor chicken egg has been blamed for high cholesterol, high fat and bacterial poisoning. But this stigma is rightfully and hopefully disappearing while the truth about eggs prevails.

Eggs are a storehouse of nutrients all contained in a built-in protective package. Unless you've chosen a vegan/vegetarian approach to food, I highly recommend incorporating eggs into healthy diet. But not just any eggs, as you will see below, but the highest quality eggs you can find. And let me explain why.

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Topics: macronutrients, whole foods, brain health, cardiovascular health, diet direction

Finding Your Optimal Nutritional Needs

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Aug 26, 2011 6:00:00 AM

As humans we share many commonalities, starting with our genetic code found tangled up in our DNA. It is common for us to try to prescribe practical measures towards things like health and nutrition that we try to apply to everyone. However, the concept of biochemical individuality has taught us that in spite of our many similarities, each one of use has a uniqueness that deserves a less general approach to our health and well being. We each are biochemically unique and have unique health requirements.

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Topics: whole foods, holistic health, genetics, cardiovascular health, lifestyle

How To Treat Coronary Artery Disease, Pt 2

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on Jul 29, 2011 6:00:00 AM

This is Part 2 of a two part series on Cardiovascular Disease, specifically Coronary Artery Disease.  Click HERE to read Part 1 of this series.

Treatment Options and Lifestyle Changes

Biomedical Approach

Typical treatments include invasive interventions like percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, coronary artery bypass grafting, and other surgeries. These treatments attempt to alleviate symptoms. Drugs are used to lower three risk factors: LDL Cholesterol, blood pressure and platelet function. These may include aspirin, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and lipid-lowering agents (statins). Patients are urged to quit smoking as a secondary prevention measure (Rakel, 2007, p. 301-303).

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Topics: anti-aging, degenerative disease, cardiovascular health

Signs Of Nutritional Imbalance Evident In Blood Chemistry Analysis

Posted by Daniel Sanelli, M.Sc. on May 18, 2011 6:00:00 AM

As we continue our series on Functional Blood Chemistry Analysis, I wanted to point out what sorts of recommendations may result after a careful evaluation of blood tests. Note also the signs of nutritional imbalance that should alert one to pursue health assessment and testing with a trained practitioner.

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Topics: cardiovascular health